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The Regionalist Movement in France 1890-1914Jean Charles-Brun and French Political Thought$
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Julian Wright

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780199264889

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199264889.001.0001

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Charles-Brun and the Félibrige: Mistral or Louis-Xavier de Ricard?

Charles-Brun and the Félibrige: Mistral or Louis-Xavier de Ricard?

Chapter:
(p.43) 3 Charles-Brun and the Félibrige: Mistral or Louis-Xavier de Ricard?
Source:
The Regionalist Movement in France 1890-1914
Author(s):

JULIAN WRIGHT

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199264889.003.0003

Belle Époque regionalism in France has been misunderstood. As Jean Charles-Brun envisaged it, regionalism was an attempt to bridge the divide between romantic literary movements and modern theories of the state. There was thus a dichotomy in regionalism between the mystique of the cultural regionalist and the politique of those whose attention was focused on problems of state reform. This dichotomy had been equally present in the Félibrige, the southern literary association where Charles-Brun had begun his own journalistic career. In fact, any analysis of the prehistory of the Fédération Régionaliste Française (FRF) must be based on an understanding of the debate within the Félibrige between those who pursued exclusively the cultural renaissance of southern France and the avant-garde, the (often younger) félibres who attempted to make the movement take account of the political consequences of this renaissance. Both Charles-Brun and Louis-Xavier de Ricard shared common intellectual ground with the federalism of Maurice Barres and Charles Maurras, but their own understanding of federalism differed on certain fundamental points.

Keywords:   federalism, Louis-Xavier de Ricard, literary movements

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