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Daniel Defoe: Master of FictionsHis Life and Works$
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Maximillian E. Novak

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780199261543

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199261543.001.0001

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Last Productive Years

Last Productive Years

Chapter:
(p.674) 28 Last Productive Years
Source:
Daniel Defoe: Master of Fictions
Author(s):

Maximillian E. Novak

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199261543.003.0057

Free from the obligations of his journalism, Daniel Defoe might have been able to nurse his ailing body and wander in the garden of his house at Stoke Newington contemplating the ‘Chequer-work’ of events that had been his life, but such an ending was hardly compatible with his restless spirit. The engagement between Henry Baker and Defoe’s daughter Sophia began to founder over questions involving the extent of her dowry. What Defoe said about trade as a form of crime without morality seems to have applied to his dealings over Sophia’s dowry. It seems clear that once the marriage became a matter of business, of money and property, Defoe treated it without decent feeling. As if his relations with Sophia and Henry Baker were not sufficient cause for him to worry about the vicissitudes of marriage, Defoe had been writing about the role of women in marriage for a number of years. Defoe left two works unpublished at his death, The Compleat English Gentleman and Of Royal Education.

Keywords:   Daniel Defoe, Henry Baker, dowry, marriage, crime, women, The Compleat English Gentleman, Of Royal Education, property, death

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