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Daniel Defoe: Master of FictionsHis Life and Works$
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Maximillian E. Novak

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780199261543

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199261543.001.0001

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A Change of Monarchs and the Whig’s Revenge

A Change of Monarchs and the Whig’s Revenge

Chapter:
(p.436) 19 A Change of Monarchs and the Whig’s Revenge
Source:
Daniel Defoe: Master of Fictions
Author(s):

Maximillian E. Novak

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199261543.003.0048

When Daniel Defoe published one of the three pamphlets that brought him so much grief, An Answer to a Question that No Body Thinks of, Vi?. But What if the Queen Should Die?, Queen Anne’s health was clearly failing. At this time, succession was already in everyone’s mind. The Whigs were struggling violently to succeed the Tories, and within the government, Henry St John Bolingbroke was struggling mightily to take over power from Robert Harley. The Queen died on August 1, but not before approving the choice of the Duke of Shrewsbury as Lord Treasurer and assuring the Protestant succession and the transition from the House of Stuart to the House of Hanover. But before that event, party quarrels, the battle over the nature of English trade, the continuing controversy over the Peace of Utrecht and its provisions, and renewed legislation against the Dissenters created divisions in society seldom matched in the history of England.

Keywords:   Daniel Defoe, Queen Anne, succession, Whigs, Robert Harley, Henry St John, Duke of Shrewsbury, House of Hanover, Dissenters, England

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