Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Efficiency and Complexity in Grammars$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

John A. Hawkins

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780199252695

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199252695.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 14 December 2019

Symmetries, Asymmetric Dependencies, and Earliness Effects

Symmetries, Asymmetric Dependencies, and Earliness Effects

Chapter:
(p.223) 8 Symmetries, Asymmetric Dependencies, and Earliness Effects
Source:
Efficiency and Complexity in Grammars
Author(s):

John A. Hawkins (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199252695.003.008

This chapter continues the discussion of Maximize On-line Processing (MaOP), focusing on the distinction between symmetry and asymmetry in cross-linguistic variation. Symmetry is observed when two categories A and B are found productively in A + B and B + A orders: both VO and OV are productive across languages, as are NRel and RelN. Asymmetry occurs when only A + B is attested or is significantly preferred, either in all languages or in a subset for which independent evidence suggests that symmetry could have occurred. Section 8.1 begins with a summary of some major symmetries and asymmetries. Section 8.2 examines asymmetric orders that appear to reflect asymmetries in the dependency relations between the categories in question. Section 8.3 considers symmetrical dependencies and orders. The central hypothesis for the distribution of symmetries and asymmetries is summarized in Sections 8.4. Section 8.5 tests some predictions deriving from this hypothesis for morphosyntactic asymmetries (principally verb agreement and case marking), and Section 8.6 discusses the processing approach presented in relation to Kayne’s (1994) antisymmetry theory.

Keywords:   symmetries, asymmetries, cross-linguistic variation, NRel, ReIN

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .