Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Chaucer, Ethics, and Gender$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Alcuin Blamires

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780199248674

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199248674.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 17 January 2020

Men, Women, and Moral Jurisdiction: ‘The Friar's Tale’, ‘The Physician's Tale’, and the Pardoner

Men, Women, and Moral Jurisdiction: ‘The Friar's Tale’, ‘The Physician's Tale’, and the Pardoner

Chapter:
(p.181) 7 Men, Women, and Moral Jurisdiction: ‘The Friar's Tale’, ‘The Physician's Tale’, and the Pardoner
Source:
Chaucer, Ethics, and Gender
Author(s):

Alcuin Blamires (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199248674.003.0008

This chapter argues that jurisdiction was not only a politically charged topic — following Wyclif’s intervention in it — but also one of great ethical concern to Chaucer. The Friar’s Tale combines both aspects in its focus on the hot topic of excommunication as the apex of the church’s abuse of jurisdiction. The widow of the tale epitomizes moral lay triumph over counterfeit ecclesiastical power by reversing the concept of the ‘curse’ (excommunication). The Physician’s Tale pursues counterfeit jurisdiction in civil government, in a design that shows Chaucer experimenting with the sort of macrocosm-and-microcosm structuring favoured by some contemporaries. The Pardoner embodies in the ‘present’ of the pilgrimage the most insidious threat posed by perversion of jurisdiction.

Keywords:   Wyclif, excommunication, widow, ecclesiastical power, civil government

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .