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Freedom and Belief$
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Galen Strawson

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199247493

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199247493.001.0001

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The Natural Epictetans

The Natural Epictetans

Chapter:
(p.218) 13 The Natural Epictetans
Source:
Freedom and Belief
Author(s):

Galen Strawson (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199247493.003.0013

The Natural Epictetans fulfil all the Structural conditions on agency, and also the Attitudinal Integration condition. They are a race of gifted, active creatures in a highly congenial world. They are never undecided in any way. They never hesitate in any way about what to do. They never consciously deliberate about what ends to pursue, or about how to pursue them — having no need to. And they never experience hindrances; they always succeed in doing what they want to do. Given that they have no experience of deliberation or indecision, the notion of radical freedom may have little content for them. They may have no identifiable belief that they are radically free, although they always do what they want to do, in a way that many take to be central to, if not sufficient for, actual freedom. Might they fail to be fully free simply in failing to have any genuine sense of themselves as free? Could experience of indecision be a necessary condition of being genuinely free?

Keywords:   Natural Epictetans, experience of indecision, actual freedom, radical freedom

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