Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Life of David Hume$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ernest C. Mossner

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780199243365

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199243365.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 15 September 2019

Drum Ecclesiastic

Drum Ecclesiastic

Chapter:
(p.336) Chapter 25 Drum Ecclesiastic
Source:
The Life of David Hume
Author(s):

Ernest Campbell Mossner

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199243365.003.0025

In June 1751 David Hume wrote to Michael Ramsay in reference to Henry Home's recent Essays on the Principles of Morality and Natural Religion. Thus early began the campaign of the religiously zealous against the two Humes, a campaign that was to come to a head in 1755 and again in 1756. Home had, moreover, piously concluded his Essays with a prayer, which, although common talk had it that it had been dictated by the Reverend Hugh Blair, was not deemed sufficiently Christian by the Evangelical Party. David and Henry were linked together in yet another way, as the friends and political helpmeets of the Moderate Party. It was thus up to the Moderates to defend both of them against untoward attacks of the rival faction out of friendship, ecclesiastical polity, and their own philosophy of humanity.

Keywords:   David Hume, Michael Ramsay, Henry Home, Essays, Hugh Blair, Evangelical Party, Moderate Party, ecclesiastical polity, philosophy, humanity

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .