Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Life of David Hume$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ernest C. Mossner

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780199243365

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199243365.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 22 September 2019

Spectator to a Rebellion

Spectator to a Rebellion

Chapter:
(p.177) Chapter 14 Spectator to a Rebellion
Source:
The Life of David Hume
Author(s):

Ernest Campbell Mossner

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199243365.003.0014

With the passing of two centuries the Jacobite Rising of 1745 inevitably tends to rank either as high romance or as opéra bouffe, depending on the temperament of the historian. At the time, however, it was deadly serious to all concerned, with the destiny of a great nation hanging in the balance. A year and a half after its collapse, David Hume wrote, realistically enough, that ‘eight Millions of People’ might ‘have been subdued and reduced to Slavery by five Thousand, the bravest, but still the most worthless amongst them’. Hume himself, however, generally favoured the opéra bouffe interpretation of the exploits of the brave but, in his opinion, otherwise ‘worthless’ Highlanders. The bare factual narrative of the Rebellion is both farcical and romantic.

Keywords:   Jacobite Rising, romance, opéra bouffe, David Hume, Slavery, Highlanders, Rebellion

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .