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Controlling Market Power in TelecommunicationsAntitrust vs. Sector-Specific Regulation$
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Damien Géradin and Michel Kerf

Print publication date: 2003

Print ISBN-13: 9780199242436

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199242436.001.0001

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Conclusions

Conclusions

Chapter:
(p.353) 10 Conclusions
Source:
Controlling Market Power in Telecommunications
Author(s):

Damien Géradin

Michel Kerf

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199242436.003.0010

This chapter presents conclusions on the analysis and comparison of the five regulatory regimes: (1) the adoption of some sector-specific rules is desirable when a country engages in market opening reforms; (2) even when sector-specific rules have been adopted, antitrust rules remain essential for the economic regulation of telecommunications; (3) the implementation of arrangements and institutional choices are central determinants of the effectiveness of the regulatory regime; (4) there is a growing degree of convergence between countries towards adoption of some of the best practices of economic regulation; and (5) while further adoption of best practices is likely and while increased competition in the local loop could bring about a regulatory shift, the five countries should not adopt absolutely identical regulatory frameworks, rather, specific solutions need to be carefully tailored to specific country circumstances and policy objectives.

Keywords:   sector-specific rules, antitrust rules, economic regulation, telecommunications, regulatory frameworks

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