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Social Provision in Low-Income CountriesNew Patterns and Emerging Trends$
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Germano Mwabu, Cecilia Ugaz, and Gordon White

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780199242191

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199242191.001.0001

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The Role of Civic Organizations in the Provision of Social Services: Towards Synergy

The Role of Civic Organizations in the Provision of Social Services: Towards Synergy

Chapter:
(p.78) (p.79) 4 The Role of Civic Organizations in the Provision of Social Services: Towards Synergy
Source:
Social Provision in Low-Income Countries
Author(s):

MARK ROBINSON

GORDON WHITE

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199242191.003.0005

Aside from the state and the market, the emergence of civil societies have greatly marked and positively contributed to the successful and enhanced provision of social services, and to the encouragement of human rights and national stability. Expansion of private voluntary institutions, manifested in both developed and developing nations, is faced with three sorts of pressures. First, in the attempt to eradicate political dynasties, discrimination, and oppression, concerned individuals intend to improve their standards of living by suggesting government deregulation acts. Second is the availability of private organisations, recognised donors, and international religious institutions. And lastly, the emergence of voluntary sectors is realised through the reduction of public services and the enlargement of participation to NGOs in official development activities.

Keywords:   state, market, civil societies, public services, social provision, social welfare

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