Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Social Provision in Low-Income CountriesNew Patterns and Emerging Trends$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Germano Mwabu, Cecilia Ugaz, and Gordon White

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780199242191

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199242191.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 22 November 2019

Provision of Social Services in Chile: A Search for a New Model

Provision of Social Services in Chile: A Search for a New Model

Chapter:
(p.210) (p.211) 10 Provision of Social Services in Chile: A Search for a New Model
Source:
Social Provision in Low-Income Countries
Author(s):

DAGMAR RACZYNSKI

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199242191.003.0011

Over the past decade, Chile has developed a sound economy and experienced social development, which are manifested through the decline in poverty rates, an increased employment level, and a greater efficiency in income distribution. Social policies in Chile are discussed here in three major sections: the first looks at the period when there is heightened government intervention; the second turns towards the era when neoliberals insisted upon a shift towards minimal state regulation and reliance on target mechanisms; and finally it examines the regime when the combined efforts of the state and the civil societies were acknowledged. After identifying major components of the phases in social policies, the chapter examines particular reforms on the health sector privatisation, primary and secondary education, and public and private relationships employed during the neoliberal and present time frames.

Keywords:   Chile, economy, social development, policies, government intervention, civil societies, privatisation

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .