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Access to Land, Rural Poverty, and Public Action$
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Alain de Janvry, Gustavo Gordillo, Elisabeth Sadoulet, and Jean-Philippe Platteau

Print publication date: 2001

Print ISBN-13: 9780199242177

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199242177.001.0001

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Land Rights and Natural Resource Management in the Transition to Individual Ownership: Case Studies from Ghana and Indonesia

Land Rights and Natural Resource Management in the Transition to Individual Ownership: Case Studies from Ghana and Indonesia

Chapter:
(p.97) 4 Land Rights and Natural Resource Management in the Transition to Individual Ownership: Case Studies from Ghana and Indonesia
Source:
Access to Land, Rural Poverty, and Public Action
Author(s):

Keijiro Otsuka

Agnes R. Quisumbing

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199242177.003.0004

Some of the fundamental concerns of property rights institutions involves the allocation of land particularly to pasture, crops, and forests, and how this land is further utilized and managed. If property rights are not well established, whether these may be in terms of family, individual, or group ownership, incentives to preserve various natural resources and investing on a wide variety of land improvements will probably be to no avail since the quality of land use and the nature of access rights have a direct relationship. In communal or customary tenure situations, the uncultivated forest land belongs to the community and is essentially controlled by the village chief, and land which is prepared for cultivation is perceived to be ‘owned’ by the family of those who cleared the land. While communal land tenure is intended for equitable distribution, this chapter looks into specific cases from Indonesia and Ghana to examine the transition from communal to individualized systems and its effects.

Keywords:   communal tenure, individualized systems, Ghana, Indonesia, property rights institutions, property rights, natural resources

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