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War and UnderdevelopmentVolume 1: The Economic and Social Consequences of Conflict$
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Frances Stewart and Valpy Fitzgerald

Print publication date: 2000

Print ISBN-13: 9780199241866

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199241866.001.0001

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The International Political Economy of Conflict in Poor Countries

The International Political Economy of Conflict in Poor Countries

Chapter:
(p.204) 8 The International Political Economy of Conflict in Poor Countries
Source:
War and Underdevelopment
Author(s):

Valpy FitzGerald

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199241866.003.0008

Even though armed conflicts in developing countries have not generally been directly conducted by developed states since the early 1980s, they have been strongly influenced by these states, because both sides require hard currency to support their military activities and supply the population on whom they rely for support. Thus, the relationship with the world economy affects the intensity of the conflict and often its duration, through trade, finance, or aid with one or more of the contending parties. In this chapter, the changing nature of the world economy itself, and in particular the independence of economic actors from nation states, is related to the provision of economic resources required to sustain conflict. The international political economy of conflict in poor countries is discussed, focusing on the impact of trade, finance, and aid on the process of conflict itself.

Keywords:   armed conflicts, world economy, trade, finance, aid, nation states, political economy, poor countries

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