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Assembling WorkRemaking Factory Regimes in Japanese Multinationals in Britain$
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Tony Elger and Chris Smith

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780199241514

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199241514.001.0001

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Theorizing Subsidiary Operations: System, Society, and Dominance Effects Revisited

Theorizing Subsidiary Operations: System, Society, and Dominance Effects Revisited

Chapter:
(p.353) CHAPTER 12 Theorizing Subsidiary Operations: System, Society, and Dominance Effects Revisited
Source:
Assembling Work
Author(s):

Tony Elger (Contributor Webpage)

Chris Smith (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199241514.003.0012

This chapter considers the wider implications of the analysis of Japanese firms developed throughout the book, both for debates about the transfer and hybridization of Japanese production models, and for broader theorizing about the subsidiary operations of international firms. It discusses the lessons of the research for three dominant images of subsidiary operations — as transplants, hybrids, or branch plants, which give differing emphases to system, society, and dominance effects in understanding the operations of such workplaces. It argues that the transfer and translation of management approaches and techniques within and between enterprises, and the evolution of work and employment relations within specific workplaces, is a more contested, multi-layered, and complex phenomena than is conventionally recognized, strongly influenced by power relations within management and the corporate mandate of the subsidiary.

Keywords:   branch plants, corporate mandate, hybridization, Japanese production models, power relations, transplants

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