Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Assembling WorkRemaking Factory Regimes in Japanese Multinationals in Britain$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Tony Elger and Chris Smith

Print publication date: 2005

Print ISBN-13: 9780199241514

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199241514.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 12 December 2019

Japanese and British Management: Alliances and Antagonisms

Japanese and British Management: Alliances and Antagonisms

Chapter:
(p.255) CHAPTER 10 Japanese and British Management: Alliances and Antagonisms
Source:
Assembling Work
Author(s):

Tony Elger (Contributor Webpage)

Chris Smith (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199241514.003.0010

This chapter analyses the organization and activities of management within these Japanese subsidiaries, and how local managers responded to Japanese innovations in work organization and employment relations. It examines the role of societal differences in the professional formation and orientations of British and Japanese managers, but also addresses variations in the way they were influenced by their specific organizational and occupational careers, and conformed to or challenged received management recipes. This highlights complex processes of alliance and antagonism, not only between British and expatriate Japanese managers, but within each grouping and between different management specialisms. For example, some British managers embraced Japanese management approaches, some distanced themselves using the language of management commonsense, but most emphasized their distinctive competence in managing British labour. The chapter maps and seeks to explain the rather different ways in which such perspectives and patterns of management micropolitics developed in the different firms.

Keywords:   British managers, common sense, distinctive competence, expatriate, societal differences, Japanese managers, management micropolitics, organizational careers, occupational careers, professional formation

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .