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Information Technology PolicyAn International History$
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Richard Coopey

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780199241057

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199241057.001.0001

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From National Champions to Little Ventures: The NEB and the Second Wave of Information Technology in Britain, 1975–1985

From National Champions to Little Ventures: The NEB and the Second Wave of Information Technology in Britain, 1975–1985

Chapter:
(p.169) 7 From National Champions to Little Ventures: The NEB and the Second Wave of Information Technology in Britain, 1975–1985
Source:
Information Technology Policy
Author(s):

Martin Campbell-Kelly

Ross Hamilton

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199241057.003.0007

The National Enterprise Board (NEB) was to be the main instrument for Labour's industrial policy in Britain when it returned to power in 1975. Foremost, the NEB was to nationalize 20 or 25 of the top 100 industrial firms in the country, so that the government would be able to control more effectively industrial development and distribute resources. In February 1977, the NEB formed a software sales company called Insac aimed at exploiting British software skills and products and selling them overseas, particularly to the US market. The NEB made both strategic and tactical investment decisions. At the strategic level it did well, at the tactical level, however, most of the NEB's investments turned out badly. In the case of Insac, the whole enterprise was misguided.

Keywords:   National Enterprise Board, IT, Britain, Labour Party, industrial policy, Insac, software

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