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Arguments for a Better World: Essays in Honor of Amartya Sen, Volume 2Society, Institutions, and Development$
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Kaushik Basu and Ravi Kanbur

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199239979

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199239979.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 12 November 2019

India and China †

India and China †

“The Art of Prolonging Life”

Chapter:
(p.48) Chapter 3 India and China
Source:
Arguments for a Better World: Essays in Honor of Amartya Sen, Volume 2
Author(s):

Lincoln C. Chen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199239979.003.0004

Amartya Sen has often cited the deep historical roots of India and China in sharing knowledge about health and longevity. In health, these two giant civilizations share many commonalities in health and development — the timing of national independence, population size, internal diversity, and their recent embrace of global markets. Life expectancy and child survival are better in China than India, but Chinese health gains have recently slowed. Exceptional health performance may be found in some Indian states like Kerala, but India also faces growing challenges of correcting inequities in health. Rapid economic growth in both countries has generated much stronger fiscal capacities to address these daunting challenges. Future health in India and China is uncertain but will likely be influenced by the major forces of changing demographics and epidemiology, reforms of the respective health sectors, and the development impact of health change.

Keywords:   health care systems, development, demography, history, epidemiology, China, India, gender equity, human capabilities

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