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Prehistoric and Protohistoric CyprusIdentity, Insularity, and Connectivity$
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A. Bernard Knapp

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199237371

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199237371.001.0001

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Islanders, Insularity, and Identity in the Mediterranean

Islanders, Insularity, and Identity in the Mediterranean

Chapter:
(p.373) 8 Islanders, Insularity, and Identity in the Mediterranean
Source:
Prehistoric and Protohistoric Cyprus
Author(s):

Bernard A. Knapp (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199237371.003.0008

The final chapter reiterates in summary fashion several key issues related to islanders' insularity and identity on prehistoric and early historic Cyprus. Following a discussion of island identities, aspects of insularity and identity on Cyprus are summarized, and suggestions are made about how some of the findings from the Cypriot case might be applied to comparative research in the wider Mediterranean. After further consideration of how insularity and connectivity in the Mediterranean has long served to link diverse peoples and cultures, it is argued that the rich and robust Mediterranean archaeological record demands not only a focused, contextual approach but also broader, comparative treatments that engage deeper research issues, problems, and priorities. To develop such a perspective, certain themes and crucial issues that might be involved in further, long‐term, comparative work in Mediterranean island archaeology and history are indicated. The chapter ends with some final, more general thoughts on islands and identities.

Keywords:   contextual approach, comparative Mediterranean research, Mediterranean island archaeology, insularity, comparative

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