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Britain’s Railways, 1997–2005Labour's Strategic Experiment$
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Terry Gourvish

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199236602

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199236602.001.0001

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The Strategic Rail Authority and the Railway, 2001–4

The Strategic Rail Authority and the Railway, 2001–4

The Strategic Vision

Chapter:
(p.112) 5 The Strategic Rail Authority and the Railway, 2001–4
Source:
Britain’s Railways, 1997–2005
Author(s):

Terry Gourvish

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199236602.003.0005

This chapter begins by discussing the search for a successor to Morton and the appointment of Richard Bowker. It then examines several complicating factors in the relationship between Bowker, the new chairman, and his Board. Subsequently, it talks about the reshaping of the SRA as well as the industry's new strategic plans. It then discusses the resignation of Stephen Bryers as Transport Secretary and the appointment of Alistair Darling for the said position. It also illustrates the franchise development made by the SRA from the year 2002 to 2004. It then presents TOC's operating costs, its pre-tax profits, and government subsidy received per passenger per kilometer. In addition, the rail industry's performance from 2000 to 2007 is evaluated. Lastly, it discusses the industry's aspirations to get involved in freight transport.

Keywords:   Morton, Richard Bowker, Board, strategic rail authority, strategic plans, Stephen Bryers, Alistair Darling, franchise development, operating costs

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