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Britain’s Railways, 1997–2005Labour's Strategic Experiment$
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Terry Gourvish

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199236602

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199236602.001.0001

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The Strategic Rail Authority and Railtrack after Hatfield

The Strategic Rail Authority and Railtrack after Hatfield

Chapter:
(p.82) 4 The Strategic Rail Authority and Railtrack after Hatfield
Source:
Britain’s Railways, 1997–2005
Author(s):

Terry Gourvish

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199236602.003.0004

This chapter begins by exploring the great impact caused by the Hatfield accident on the strategic rail authority (SRA) and its frustrated strategies and franchising. It then discusses the general election on 7 June 2001 and the reorganization of the transportation department by the new government. It also talks about Stephen Bryers, the then newly appointed Secretary of State for Transport, Local Government and the Regions, and John Spellar as Transport Minister. Subsequently, this chapter explains that the decision of taking Railtrack into administration and rejecting the alternative of another review of the company's requirements by the Regulator may have been Bryer's and the Government's, though it is clear that the company itself played a part in its own demise. Lastly, it also discusses Morton's reactions on Bryer's decisions for the company.

Keywords:   Hatfield accident, strategic rail authority, franchising, Stephen Bryers, John Spellar, Morton, reorganization, general election, Railtrack, Regulator

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