Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Speech and HarmControversies Over Free Speech$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ishani Maitra and Mary Kate McGowan

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199236282

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199236282.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 20 November 2019

Power in Public: Reactions, Responses, and Resistance to Offensive Public Speech

Power in Public: Reactions, Responses, and Resistance to Offensive Public Speech

Chapter:
(p.148) Power in Public: Reactions, Responses, and Resistance to Offensive Public Speech
Source:
Speech and Harm
Author(s):

by Laura Beth Nielsen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199236282.003.0007

Many maintain that the proper remedy for harmful speech is ‘more speech’. This chapter argues that this prescription relies on faulty empirical assumptions. As the empirical evidence shows, targets of problematic race- and gender-related public speech do not in fact ‘talk back’, for many reasons. The legal treatment of such speech contrasts with that of begging. Because there are already a variety of formal mechanisms in place that discourage begging, it is easier for targets to respond to begging. In this way, the law protects the powerful from harassment in public places, while placing on its less privileged members a burdensome choice between responding or accepting their own subordination.

Keywords:   free speech, First Amendment, begging, sex, race, harm, harassment, public, speech

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .