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Chronic Pain EpidemiologyFrom Aetiology to Public Health$
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Peter Croft, Fiona M. Blyth, and Danielle van der Windt

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199235766

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199235766.001.0001

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The global occurrence of chronic pain: an introduction

The global occurrence of chronic pain: an introduction

Chapter:
(p.9) Chapter 2 The global occurrence of chronic pain: an introduction
Source:
Chronic Pain Epidemiology
Author(s):

Peter Croft (Contributor Webpage)

Fiona M. Blyth

Danielle van der Windt

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199235766.003.0002

This chapter begins with a brief review of studies that explore chronic pain as a public health problem. It then discusses the prevalence of self-reported chronic pain, prevalence of chronic pain based on health care data, global burden of chronic pain, and time trends of pain in populations. Population surveys suggest that self-reported chronic pain occurs to a similar extent in many parts of the world. Chronic pain is emerging as an important component of the global burden of disability. Musculoskeletal pain and headaches dominate in terms of frequency and overall impact, but the more severe end of the spectrum is mostly about multiple pains. There is evidence that the reporting of chronic pain has increased in recent decades.

Keywords:   chronic pain, public health problem, pain prevalence, global burden, multiple pains, disability

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