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Industrial Policy and DevelopmentThe Political Economy of Capabilities Accumulation$
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Mario Cimoli, Giovanni Dosi, and Joseph E. Stiglitz

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199235261

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199235261.001.0001

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Intellectual Property and Industrial Development: A Critical Assessment

Intellectual Property and Industrial Development: A Critical Assessment

Chapter:
(p.506) 19 Intellectual Property and Industrial Development: A Critical Assessment
Source:
Industrial Policy and Development
Author(s):

Mario Cimoli

Benjamin Coriat

Annalisa Primi

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199235261.003.0019

This chapter offers a sort of roadmap for the analysis of the relationship between intellectual property right protection and industrial development. The general point is that all successful catching-up episodes occurred under condition of weak IPR regimes, allowing easier knowledge acquisition and imitation. Conversely, strong IPR regimes are strongly promoted by countries on the innovation frontier. Nowadays, the latter, and in particular the US, strategically use IP protection as a mechanism to protect the rent-generating potential stemming from the technological capabilities accumulated in their firms. This is a de facto industrial policy and an “anti-developmental” one, which ought to be matched by “pro-diffusion” policies in catching-up countries.

Keywords:   intellectual property rights, imitation, diffusion, IPR rents, industrial development, IPR regimes, IP protection

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