Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Relative Truth$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Manuel García-Carpintero and Max Kölbel

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199234950

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199234950.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 20 August 2019

Frege, Relativism and Faultless Disagreement

Frege, Relativism and Faultless Disagreement

Chapter:
(p.225) 10 Frege, Relativism and Faultless Disagreement
Source:
Relative Truth
Author(s):

Sven Rosenkranz

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199234950.003.0010

Allegedly, relativism can make sense of faultless disagreements, where A and B faultlessly disagree if A sincerely asserts P, B sincerely asserts ~P and yet neither assertion is incorrect. Such cases seem to abound in areas of evaluative discourse. The trouble with taking these appearances at face value is that P and ~P cannot both be true so that at least one of the speakers would seem at fault. To defuse this objection, relativists suggest conceiving of propositional truth as being relative to perspectives. Drawing on Fregean insights into the nature of assertion, this chapter argues that this manoeuvre will not work and that relativists are anyway hard-pressed to account for genuine disagreement. Discarding the idea of faultlessness, some positive suggestions are made of how relativists might recover a sense in which A and B genuinely disagree. One tentative conclusion is that moral relativism is the non-cognitivists' best bet.

Keywords:   Frege, faultless disagreement, assertion, moral relativism, non-cognitivism

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .