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Pushkin's Lyric Intelligence$
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Andrew Kahn

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199234745

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199234745.001.0001

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Nature and Romantic Subjectivity

Nature and Romantic Subjectivity

Chapter:
(p.117) 5 Nature and Romantic Subjectivity
Source:
Pushkin's Lyric Intelligence
Author(s):

Andrew Kahn (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199234745.003.0006

This chapter explores how invention and imagination marked Pushkin's lyric thinking about nature. It argues that it is not until the 1830s that Pushkin's lyric treatment of nature finally aligns him with Romantic subjectivity. The chapter begins with a discussion of the role of nature in his first collection of poems, a patently important moment when Pushkin, the famed author of narrative, achieved comparable status as a lyric poet. It considers two examples of the Pushkinian Greater Romantic Lyric, which are among his greatest poems, ‘Autumn’ and ‘I visit once again. . . ’, the latter a revision of Wordsworth's ‘Tintern Abbey’ (1798). It is because nature is more prominent for its absence than presence in Pushkin's lyric that these poems mark an exceptional trial of a Romantic mode for Pushkin.

Keywords:   Pushkin, lyric poetry, Romanticism, Autumn, I visit once again, Wordsworth, Tintern Abbey

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