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The Mind in Nature$
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C. B. Martin

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199234103

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199234103.001.0001

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Tactile‐Motor‐Kinaesthetic Perception

Tactile‐Motor‐Kinaesthetic Perception

Chapter:
(p.162) 13 Tactile‐Motor‐Kinaesthetic Perception
Source:
The Mind in Nature
Author(s):

C. B. Martin (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199234103.003.0013

This chapter begins with a brief discussion of tactile-motor-kinaesthetic perceiving. It argues that through use of the tactile-motor-kinaesthetic sensory input and imagery that we learn the boundaries of self and not-self, and the geography of our own bodies and the three-dimensionality of things and of spaces between them. It then introduces the ‘Feeling Once, Feeling Twice Phenomenon’ that is manifested when you place your hands on a surface and what you feel with your hands does not feel back; then, as you move your hands to come into contact with one another, what you feel does (even quite sensuously so) feel back. What feels back, and what is felt as continuous (for instance, ends of the hair) with that, forms the geography of your body and its limits against what is not your body, namely, what does not feel back.

Keywords:   tactile-motor-kinaesthetic perceiving, sensory input, imagery, self, feeling, feeling back

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