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Embodied Communication in Humans and
Machines$
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Ipke Wachsmuth, Manuela Lenzen, and Günther Knoblich

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199231751

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199231751.001.0001

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Laborious intersubjectivity: attentional struggle and embodied communication in an auto-shop

Laborious intersubjectivity: attentional struggle and embodied communication in an auto-shop

Chapter:
(p.201) 10 Laborious intersubjectivity: attentional struggle and embodied communication in an auto-shop
Source:
Embodied Communication in Humans and Machines
Author(s):

Jürgen Streeck

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199231751.003.0010

This chapter shows how fine-grained speech and bodily signaling interact in an every-day discourse. It first analyses a dialogue in an auto-shop using microethnography, a method which pays particular attention to the sequential production of gestures, utterances, and act. It then presents empirical evidence for the need to approach embodied communication from an ecological perspective, a perspective which does not attribute intersubjectivity to a single context-free mechanism or set of mechanisms, but seeks to explicate it in terms of the resources and obstacles that the participants cope with. To explain how embodied communication works, it is important to focus on the sometimes laborious ways in which everyday actors coordinate heterogeneous bodily modalities, including gaze and gesture, and couple them with speech and the environment of the interaction.

Keywords:   speech, bodily signalling, microethnography, gestures, utterances, act, embodied communication, gaze

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