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Kelvin: Life, Labours and Legacy$
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Raymond Flood, Mark McCartney, and Andrew Whitaker

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199231256

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199231256.001.0001

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Kelvin and the Development of Science in Meiji Japan

Kelvin and the Development of Science in Meiji Japan

Chapter:
13 Kelvin and the Development of Science in Meiji Japan
Source:
Kelvin: Life, Labours and Legacy
Author(s):

Colin Latimer

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199231256.003.0013

The modern era in Japan is normally considered as beginning in 1868 when the feudal age, or Edo era, finally ended. The Emperor Meiji declared the restoration of Imperial rule in January 1868 (the Meiji restoration) and he and his entourage transferred the capital from Kyoto to Edo / Tokyo (Edo was renamed Tokyo) in September 1868. The new and globally ambitious Meiji government quickly realized the importance of science and technology. A major problem was the shortage of teachers capable of teaching advanced courses. So Japanese sought Kelvin's involvement in the appointment of teaching staff. This chapter discusses Kelvin's protégés in Tokyo and Japanese scholars in Glasgow.

Keywords:   Japan, shortage of teachers, Lord Kelvin, science and technology, Emperor Meiji

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