Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Literature and Politics in Cromwellian England$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Blair Worden

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199230822

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199230822.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 16 October 2019

Marvell and Nedham

Marvell and Nedham

Chapter:
(p.54) 3 Marvell and Nedham
Source:
Literature and Politics in Cromwellian England
Author(s):

Blair Worden

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199230822.003.0004

Like John Milton, Andrew Marvell can seem a spokesman for solitariness. Though he ‘would drink liberally by himself’, to ‘refresh his spirits and exalt his muse’, he would—unlike Marchamont Nedham—‘never drink hard in company’ or ‘play the good-fellow in any man's company’. Marvell's writing, like Milton's, makes a virtue of single-handedness. Like Milton's solitary heroes, Marvell's Oliver Cromwell, who in the poem on ‘The First Anniversary’ of the protectorate moves ‘in dark nights, and in cold days alone’, never seems to need a friend or counsellor, and would be a less imposing force beside one. Marvell himself can be vividly alone in his verse. If the later Marvell is a lyrical writer as well as a political writer, the earlier one proves to be as much a political animal, and as close to the world of public satire and polemic, as his successor.

Keywords:   John Milton, Andrew Marvell, solitariness, Marchamont Nedham, Oliver Cromwell, satire, polemic

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .