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Dragonflies and DamselfliesModel Organisms for Ecological and Evolutionary Research$
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Alex Córdoba-Aguilar

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199230693

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199230693.001.0001

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Lifetime reproductive success and sexual selection theory

Lifetime reproductive success and sexual selection theory

Chapter:
(p.153) CHAPTER 12 Lifetime reproductive success and sexual selection theory
Source:
Dragonflies and Damselflies
Author(s):

Walter D. Koenig

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199230693.003.0012

This chapter summarizes studies of lifetime reproductive success (LRS) conducted on odonates. Such studies have focused on many characters, but have typically concluded that survivorship — the main component of natural selection, is more important than mating efficiency — a primary component of sexual selection, in determining LRS. They have also frequently found that environmental factors are important and that selection and the opportunity for selection vary considerably depending on density, sex ratio, and community composition. LRS studies have been most successful when focused on specific traits and when complemented by experimental manipulations. Progress in understanding the current actions of natural and sexual selection is thus most likely to involve long-term LRS work combined with experimental or comparative approaches. Particularly desirable are studies that incorporate the larval stage in fitness calculations, perform parentage analyses to determine realized fitness, and consider the role of non-breeding behaviours such as foraging efficiency.

Keywords:   natural selection, opportunity for selection, realized fitness, sexual selection, survivorship, density, sex ratio, community composition

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