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Nouvelle Théologie and Sacramental OntologyA Return to Mystery$
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Hans Boersma

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199229642

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199229642.001.0001

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The Mystery of the Human Spirit: De Lubac and Bouillard on Nature and the Supernatural

The Mystery of the Human Spirit: De Lubac and Bouillard on Nature and the Supernatural

Chapter:
(p.86) 3 The Mystery of the Human Spirit: De Lubac and Bouillard on Nature and the Supernatural
Source:
Nouvelle Théologie and Sacramental Ontology
Author(s):

Hans Boersma (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199229642.003.0003

Chapters 3 and 4 focus specifically on the nature-supernatural relationship, the first dealing with Henri de Lubac and Henri Bouillard. Both drew on Neoplatonism to recover a sense of mystery, emphasizing the ‘upward’ direction of the natural world. De Lubac opposed the neo-Thomist separation of nature and the supernatural by insisting on a natural desire (desiderium naturale) of the vision of God and by opposing the notion of pure nature (pura natura). Bouillard rejected neo-Thomism in his doctrine of grace (questioning Thomas's notion of ‘elevating grace’) and in his epistemology (using the doctrine of analogy to explain human truth claims). At the same time, in opposition to Karl Barth, Bouillard wished to retain the relative autonomy of the natural realm. Thus, for de Lubac the human spirit could serve as a sacramental mystery, while for Bouillard human discourse was able to draw human realities into the mystery of God.

Keywords:   Henri de Lubac, Henri Bouillard, Neoplatonism, natural desire, pure nature, elevating grace, truth, analogy, Karl Barth, relative autonomy

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