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Evolution through Genetic Exchange$
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Michael L. Arnold

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199229031

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199229031.001.0001

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History of investigations

History of investigations

Chapter:
(p.1) Chapter 1 History of investigations
Source:
Evolution through Genetic Exchange
Author(s):

Michael L. Arnold

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199229031.003.0001

This chapter begins with a brief history of pre-Darwinian, evolutionary studies concerning genetic exchange. It then discusses various organismal systems to exemplify some ways in which post-Modern Synthesis research has been pursued to test the evolutionary role of genetic exchange. It considers examples of well-developed evolutionary model systems including plants, animals, bacteria, and viruses. These were chosen because they reflect broadly based, in-depth studies of the possible evolutionary consequences from natural hybridization and/or lateral gene transfer. Some cases (e.g. viral lineages) also afford the opportunity to point to the uncertainty in categorizing them as either natural hybridization or lateral gene transfer.

Keywords:   Darwin, genetic exchange, organismal systems, Modern Synthesis, evolution

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