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Community EcologyProcesses, Models, and Applications$
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Herman A. Verhoef and Peter J. Morin

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199228973

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199228973.001.0001

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Applications of community ecology approaches in terrestrial ecosystems: local problems, remote causes

Applications of community ecology approaches in terrestrial ecosystems: local problems, remote causes

Chapter:
(p.83) Chapter 7 Applications of community ecology approaches in terrestrial ecosystems: local problems, remote causes
Source:
Community Ecology
Author(s):

Wim H. van der Putten

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199228973.003.0008

One of the greatest challenges facing applied ecologists is to elucidate causes of unwanted developments in natural and production ecosystems, and to translate this knowledge into management decisions without causing unintended side-effects. Such a strategy requires interventions based on solid understanding of the underlying mechanisms, as well as proper predictions of future direct and indirect effects of the interventions. Good applied ecological research quite often may reveal our shortage of knowledge, which in turn will fuel fundamental research initiatives. Community ecology plays a key role in many aspects of applied ecology because the abundance of species strongly depends on competitive and predatory interactions among species that are part of food webs. Food web interactions are major drivers of ecosystem processes, and they are key to the delivery of ecosystem goods and services.

Keywords:   Bottom-up, climate change, ecosystem restoration, multitrophic interaction, mycorrhizal fungi, plant–soil feedback, succession, temporal instability, top-down

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