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Animal Sacrifice in Ancient Greek Religion, Judaism, and Christianity, 100 BC to AD 200$
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Maria-Zoe Petropoulou

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199218547

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199218547.001.0001

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Christians and Animal Sacrifice in the Period up to ad 200

Christians and Animal Sacrifice in the Period up to ad 200

Chapter:
(p.211) 6 Christians and Animal Sacrifice in the Period up to AD 200
Source:
Animal Sacrifice in Ancient Greek Religion, Judaism, and Christianity, 100 BC to AD 200
Author(s):

Maria‐Zoe Petropoulou

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199218547.003.0006

The chapter summarizes Christian attitudes toward animal sacrifice in the first two centuries AD, with regard to both Greek and Jewish religion, and with a clear distinction between the period before AD 70 and the period after AD 70. As regards the Christian teaching towards pagan addressees, the preaching against the offering of sacrifices mainly comes to the fore in the Apologetics of the 2nd century. Similarly, the Christian objection to Jewish animal sacrifice is explicitly expressed only in the 2nd century AD, but traces of it are found already in the 1st century. Second-century attestations show Christians abstaining from sacrifices, something which played a role in their being arrested or condemned by the pagan authorities. Special attention is also paid to the issue of sacrificial metaphors as a factor contributory to the alienation of worshipers from the practical aspects of animal sacrifice.

Keywords:   abstinence, Apologists, Apologetics, arrest, Christianity, religion, metaphors, pagans

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