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Sociobiology of Communicationan interdisciplinary perspective$
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Patrizia d'Ettorre and David P. Hughes

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199216840

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199216840.001.0001

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Concluding remarks

Concluding remarks

Chapter:
(p.289) Concluding remarks
Source:
Sociobiology of Communication
Author(s):

David P. Hughes

Patrizia d'Ettorre

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199216840.003.0017

As evidenced by this contributed volume communication is multifarious. It exists among organisms but also between cells and in networks, and even possesses inorganic properties as a result of collective organization. The approaches that can be adopted to study communication are similarly varied — from the mechanistic to the functional, and from cell biology to linguistics. This book has formulated the synthesis that this volume has achieved in a personal sociobiological view that encompasses both a reductionist and a systems biology view. The expanding toolbox with which to dissect mechanisms requires a robust interdisciplinary logic and sound theory to achieve the functional balance needed to make further progress in the evolutionary study of communication.

Keywords:   sociobiology, phenotype, organism, reductionism, synthesis

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