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Receptive Ecumenism and the Call to Catholic LearningExploring a Way for Contemporary Ecumenism$
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Paul Murray

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199216451

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199216451.001.0001

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Receptive Ecumenism and the Future of Ecumenical Dialogues—Privileging Differentiated Consensus and Drawing its Institutional Consequences 1

Receptive Ecumenism and the Future of Ecumenical Dialogues—Privileging Differentiated Consensus and Drawing its Institutional Consequences 1

Chapter:
(p.385) 27 Receptive Ecumenism and the Future of Ecumenical Dialogues—Privileging Differentiated Consensus and Drawing its Institutional Consequences1
Source:
Receptive Ecumenism and the Call to Catholic Learning
Author(s):

Hervé Legrand, OP

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199216451.003.0032

This chapter comments on the possible future directions of ecumenism. There are serious problems confronting the Anglican communion, the Orthodox Church, and the Roman Catholic Church. These problems mean that the dream of structural union, born in the wake of the Second Vatican Council, will not be realized in the foreseeable future. Although the path towards reunion will be longer than some had foreseen, the duration of the process is not, in itself, an issue. What is, arguably, first at issue is the model according to which our bilateral dialogues have hitherto been conducted. Equally at issue is the reception of these agreements in the day-to-day life of the churches: the somewhat detached intellectual adhesion generally afforded them does not lead to concrete reforms without which desired unity remains out of reach. The specific responsibility of theologians in this regard is discussed.

Keywords:   ecumenical learning, dialogue, Roman Catholics, Orthodox Church, Anglicans

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