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Market, Class, and Employment$
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Patrick McGovern, Stephen Hill, Colin Mills, and Michael White

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199213375

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199213375.001.0001

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Conclusions

Conclusions

Chapter:
(p.283) 9 Conclusions
Source:
Market, Class, and Employment
Author(s):

Patrick McGovern

Stephen Hill

Colin Mills

Michael White

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199213375.003.0009

The persistence and indeed resurgence of within-company career expectations among employees is noted. The central empirical conclusion of this research is that the marketization thesis fails in each of its three major claims, when applied to the contemporary British experience. First, while it is correct to draw attention to growing uncertainty in employment conditions, the predicted declines in stable, open-ended, long-term employment and in internal careers have not taken place, and employers have not come to rely on the fear of job loss to motivate employees. Secondly, employers have maintained and, in most respects, extended internalized practices that both presume and support a long-term relationship with employees. Thirdly, inequality in terms of material rewards and benefits, overall job quality, and control of work, have remained strongly differentiated by class.

Keywords:   marketization, employee, employment, job quality, work

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