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Market, Class, and Employment$
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Patrick McGovern, Stephen Hill, Colin Mills, and Michael White

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199213375

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199213375.001.0001

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The marketization of the employment relationship?

The marketization of the employment relationship?

Chapter:
(p.36) 2 The marketization of the employment relationship?
Source:
Market, Class, and Employment
Author(s):

Patrick McGovern

Stephen Hill

Colin Mills

Michael White

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199213375.003.0002

A brief review of the literature from the UK is given to show how the idea of an increasingly market-driven employment relationship has been taken up. Evidence relating to four areas of the employment relationship important to what is interpreted as the marketization thesis is shown. The four areas are temporary forms of employment, job security, career structures, and remuneration. In addition, some empirical evidence on the extent to which the employment relationship has been marketized is reported. The chapter discusses the major institutional issue relating to the contemporary labour market, which is that employers, by and large, employ the same workers in the same jobs across the years.

Keywords:   marketization, employment relationship, labour market, job security, career structures, remuneration

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