Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Classics and National Cultures$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Susan A. Stephens and Phiroze Vasunia

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199212989

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199212989.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 14 November 2019

Mimicry and Classical Allusion in V. S. Naipaul's The Mimic Men

Mimicry and Classical Allusion in V. S. Naipaul's The Mimic Men

Chapter:
(p.100) 5 Mimicry and Classical Allusion in V. S. Naipaul's The Mimic Men
Source:
Classics and National Cultures
Author(s):

Emily Greenwood (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199212989.003.0006

This chapter undertakes a reading of the classical allusions in V. S. Naipaul's novel The Mimic Men (1967), a novel which is often interpreted as Naipaul's verdict on the mimic dependency of (post‐)colonial societies. Emily Greenwood argues that Naipaul uses classical allusions to show that not only were the British in the Caribbean themselves mimics of the cultures of Greece and Rome, but also that the presence of mimicry in these very cultures reveals the absurdity of the appropriation of the civilizations of Greece and Rome in the service of colonial mythmaking. As a specific example, the chapter examines Naipaul's ironizing use of a famous phrase from Virgil's Aeneid.

Keywords:   Naipaul, C. L. R. James, Caribbean, Virgil, mimicry, virtus

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .