Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The China QuestionGreat Power Rivalry and British Isolation, 1894-1905$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

T. G. Otte

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199211098

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199211098.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 25 January 2020

‘An infinitely larger Eastern question’: The Powers and the Sino‐Japanese War, 1894–5

‘An infinitely larger Eastern question’: The Powers and the Sino‐Japanese War, 1894–5

Chapter:
(p.28) 1 ‘An infinitely larger Eastern question’: The Powers and the Sino‐Japanese War, 1894–5
Source:
The China Question
Author(s):

T. G. Otte (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199211098.003.0002

This chapter examines the build-up to the 1894–5 Sino–Japanese War, and the wider strategic and diplomatic fall-out of the conflict. The war threw into sharper relief the problems of Britain's ‘isolation’. It argues that contrary to previous interpretations, Kimberley and Rosebery began to shift British policy in the region, away from supporting China in an effort to contain Russian expansion in Asia. Their decision not to join the other Powers in opposing Japan at the end of the war held out the option of future Anglo-Japanese cooperation. The war also underlined the faultlines in Anglo-Russian relations in the Far East and beyond. Britain had sought cooperation with Russia during the war; it proved unattainable, and so did cooperation with France and Germany. A gap had opened up between Britain and the other Great Powers.

Keywords:   Anglo–Russian relations, isolation, Kimberley, Rosebery, Shimonoseki

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .