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Defining Art, Creating the CanonArtistic Value in an Era of Doubt$
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Paul Crowther

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199210688

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199210688.001.0001

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Musical Meaning and Value

Musical Meaning and Value

Chapter:
(p.163) 7 Musical Meaning and Value
Source:
Defining Art, Creating the Canon
Author(s):

Paul Crowther (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199210688.003.0008

This chapter analyses the nature of auditory experience and shows how music might be seen as historically emergent from this. The theory is then linked to an account of emotion and gesture, and music is further characterized as a formalization of vocal gesture, which (through pitch) comes to be achievable through instruments rather than the voice alone. It is argued that musical meaning centres on virtual expression, and that music's distinctiveness as an artistic medium follows on from this in complex ways. Attention is also paid to the conditions whereby we can make a transition from music per se to musical art. The basis of this is that comparative horizon of the medium's diachronic history already raised in previous chapters. Attention is paid to the nature of canonic value in music.

Keywords:   auditory experience, vocal gesture, emotion, virtual expression, musical art, comparative horizon, diachronic history, canonic value

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