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KierkegaardThinking Christianly in an Existential Mode$
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Sylvia Walsh

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199208357

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199208357.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 14 October 2019

Religion, Culture, and Society

Religion, Culture, and Society

Chapter:
(p.173) 7 Religion, Culture, and Society
Source:
Kierkegaard
Author(s):

Sylvia Walsh

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199208357.003.0007

This chapter discusses the relation of religion, culture, and society in Kierkegaard's writings. It discusses the phenomenon of leveling in the present age, the phantom of the public, the principle of association, unum noris omnes, the European crisis of 1848, martyrs and pastors as reformers of the crowd, the relation of religion and politics, the Church militant and the Church triumphant, and the function and authority of the institutional church. It examines Kierkegaard's final open attack against the state church. The attack came from two stages, first from a series of articles in a political newspaper, Fædrelandet, followed by a series of self-published pamphlets called The Moment. The final section investigates the reception of his writings and contributions to Christian thought.

Keywords:   Søren Kierkegaard, leveling, phantom of the public, unum noris omnes, European crisis of 1848, Church militant, The Moment, Fædrelandet, Christian thought

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