Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Remedies in International Human Rights Law$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Dinah Shelton

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780199207534

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199207534.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use (for details see www.oxfordscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 24 June 2019

Conclusions

Conclusions

Chapter:
(p.465) Conclusions
Source:
Remedies in International Human Rights Law
Author(s):

DINAH SHELTON

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199207534.003.0016

One of the most important legal developments of the modern era, both nationally and internationally, has been the opening of avenues of complaint for private citizens against oppressive action by government agents and agencies and the affording of remedies when violations are found. The right of access to judicial remedies is widely guaranteed in international human rights treaties and can be considered as part of the corpus of the customary international law of human rights. Remedies not only provide redress for the individual victim, but they serve the community interest in sanctioning the perpetrator and deterring future violations by the same or other wrongdoers. They thus serve the rule of law at all levels of society. The nature and scope of remedies is generally consistent throughout the world.

Keywords:   remedies, human rights, international law, deterrence, rule of law

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .