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Ancient LettersClassical and Late Antique Epistolography$
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Ruth Morello and A. D. Morrison

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199203956

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199203956.001.0001

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‘…when who should walk into the room but…’: Epistoliterarity in Cicero, Ad Qfr. 3.1

‘…when who should walk into the room but…’: Epistoliterarity in Cicero, Ad Qfr. 3.1

Chapter:
(p.37) 2 ‘…when who should walk into the room but…’: Epistoliterarity in Cicero, Ad Qfr. 3.1
Source:
Ancient Letters
Author(s):

John Henderson (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199203956.003.0003

This chapter examines the three-book collection of (Marcus) Cicero's Letters to (Quintus) Cicero that dramatizes the years of their writer's tempora (‘crisis’) between the fall-out from his consulate, through his banishment, return, and shift of alignment from unease with Pompey to investment in Caesar (60-54 BCE). Besides Marcus' own spell out in the cold, they are occasioned by three periods of Qfr.'s absence from Italy, as praetorian proconsul of Asia, and as legate to Pompey in Sardinia, and as legate to Caesar in Gaul. Their epistoliterarity spans the whole range from formal broadside through mimetic bulletin to keeping channels open. A text and translation follow the chapter and conclusion, and a bibliographical note is appended.

Keywords:   epistoliterarity, Cicero, ancient letters, Rome, epistles

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