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Greek Lyric, Tragedy, and Textual CriticismCollected Papers$
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W. S. Barrett and M. L. West

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780199203574

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2007

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199203574.001.0001

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The Oligaithidai and their Victories (Pindar, Olympian 13; SLG 339, 340) *

The Oligaithidai and their Victories (Pindar, Olympian 13; SLG 339, 340) *

Chapter:
(p.98) 7 The Oligaithidai and their Victories (Pindar, Olympian 13; SLG 339, 340)*
Source:
Greek Lyric, Tragedy, and Textual Criticism
Author(s):

W. S. Barrett

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199203574.003.0007

This chapter discusses Pindar's thirteenth Olympian. The ode celebrates a double Olympic victory (stadion and pentathlon) won in 464 by a member of the Corinthian family of the Oligaithidai, Xenophon, son of Thessalos. The family had won enormous numbers of victories throughout the Greek world, and at the end of the ode (98-113) Pindar gives a summary catalogue: three at Olympia, six at Pytho, sixty at the Isthmos, sixty at Nemea, and others at a long list of venues from Marathon to Sicily. But this final catalogue is only the second in the ode: towards the beginning (29-46) Pindar has already listed (what are included in the totals of the final catalogue) the victories of Xenophon himself, of his father, and of other named persons who are evidently Xenophon's closer relatives.

Keywords:   Pindar, Olympian 13, Xenophon, Olympic victory, Oligaithidai family

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