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A. J. Appasamy and his Reading of RāmānujaA Comparative Study in Divine Embodiment$
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Brian Philip Dunn

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198791416

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198791416.001.0001

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An Introduction to Ayadurai Jesudason Appasamy

An Introduction to Ayadurai Jesudason Appasamy

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 An Introduction to Ayadurai Jesudason Appasamy
Source:
A. J. Appasamy and his Reading of Rāmānuja
Author(s):

Brian Philip Dunn

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198791416.003.0001

Chapter 1 is an introduction to Appasamy, a biographical outline of his life and career that traces his academic and devotional formation, his reception, and eventual marginalization by expatriate theologians. Following an initial outline of the focus, parameters, and structure of the research, Appasamy’s early academic formation at Harvard, Oxford, and Marburg during the early 1920s is explored, identifying in his work the influence of scholars such as Streeter, Dodd, Otto, Heiler, and Von Hügel. Along with his growing identification in India as a bhakta, a Yeshu devotee, his first forays into Rāmānuja’s texts and thinking are identified. Following his more radical proposal for a ‘Christological reconstruction’ based on ‘Rāmānuja’s philosophy’, a polemical response by expatriate theologians is identified, framed as a postcolonial story through Homi Bhabha’s identification of the ‘hybrid’ as ‘heretic’. The chapter concludes with an overview of the primary and secondary source material.

Keywords:   bhakti, mysticism, phenomenology, hybrid, postcolonial, Karl Barth, Homi Bhabha, Johannine

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