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The Amorous RestorationLove, Sex, and Politics in Early Nineteenth-Century France$
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Andrew J. Counter

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198785996

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198785996.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Love, Sex, Politics

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
The Amorous Restoration
Author(s):

Andrew J. Counter

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198785996.003.0001

The Introduction explores the idea of a supposed ‘unrationalized coexistence’ of competing sexual and political mores under the Restoration, some holdovers from the Ancien Régime, others peculiar to the new; the phrase ‘unrationalized coexistence’ is borrowed from Eve Sedgwick, but the concept is drawn from Restoration writers’ own depictions of the confused, transitional character of their society. The Introduction also examines the crucial rhetorical figure of ellipsis, which became in this period an unmistakeable means of evoking either the sexual, or the political, or both. The Introduction concludes by considering the notion of ‘Platonic love’—relationships characterized by unconsummated erotic desire—that was the most influential, though also the most contested, model of love in Restoration high art.

Keywords:   ellipsis, Bourbon Restoration, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, Platonic love, Stendhal, Marceline Desbordes-Valmore, Auguste Ricard

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