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Ammianus' JulianNarrative and Genre in the Res Gestae$
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Alan J. Ross

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198784951

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: August 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198784951.001.0001

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In Search of a Latin Julian

In Search of a Latin Julian

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 In Search of a Latin Julian
Source:
Ammianus' Julian
Author(s):

Alan J. Ross

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198784951.003.0001

The first section of this introductory chapter provides a survey of the literary and political circumstances within which Ammianus wrote the Res Gestae. It examines the depictions of Julian that were in circulation by the 380s, and suggests that he was not a figure sympathetic to a Latin-speaking audience in the West. The identity that the narrator of the Res Gestae crafts for himself—a Greek writing in Latin, whose career as a soldier coincides closely with that of Julian—is designed to be a powerful tool for his authority in writing about Julian in these circumstances. The second part of the chapter introduces two literary theories—narratology and intertextuality—that are deployed throughout the rest of the book in examining key episodes in Ammianus narrative of Julian.

Keywords:   narratology, intertextuality, breviary history, Gregory Nazianzus, Libanius, Eunapius, Amida

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