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History of UniversitiesVolume XXIX / 1$
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Mordechai Feingold

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780198779919

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198779919.001.0001

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Sari Kivistö, The Vices of Learning: Morality and Knowledge at Early Modern Universities (Leiden/Boston: Brill, 2014), viii+304 pp. ISBN: 9789004264120

Sari Kivistö, The Vices of Learning: Morality and Knowledge at Early Modern Universities (Leiden/Boston: Brill, 2014), viii+304 pp. ISBN: 9789004264120

Chapter:
(p.203) Sari Kivistö, The Vices of Learning: Morality and Knowledge at Early Modern Universities (Leiden/Boston: Brill, 2014), viii+304 pp. ISBN: 9789004264120
Source:
History of Universities
Author(s):

Arnoud Visser

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198779919.003.0010

This chapter discusses the works of academic historian Sari Kivistö, an expert in charting the moral discourse about scholarly vices in late Baroque and early Enlightenment Europe. Kivistö concentrates largely on dissertations written by German intellectuals between approximately 1670 and 1730, a period where academic self-criticism became a flourishing genre of publication. Kivistö's main purpose is to investigate how scholarly vices were conceptualized in this period of change, exploring in particular the connections between knowledge and morality. Her exploration is divided into five thematic chapters that explore the vices of self-love, the desire for fame, quarrelling, curiosity, and bad manners. Although these vices regularly overlap, Kivistö explains the division by stating that these sins are the most prominently discussed in the primary sources.

Keywords:   Sari Kivistö, moral discourse, vice, scholarly vices, Baroque, early Enlightenment Europe, academic self-criticism, publication, knowledge, morality

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