Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Descartes and CartesianismEssays in Honour of Desmond Clarke$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Stephen Gaukroger and Catherine Wilson

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780198779643

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198779643.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 15 September 2019

Context, History, and Interpretation

Context, History, and Interpretation

The Religious Dimension in Descartes’ Metaphysics

Chapter:
(p.42) 3 Context, History, and Interpretation
Source:
Descartes and Cartesianism
Author(s):

John Cottingham

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198779643.003.0003

Descartes’ philosophical outlook was shaped not just by the aspirations of the new mathematical physics that he helped create, but also by the contemplative tradition of Plato and Augustine that remained at the centre of his worldview. Giving due acknowledgement to Descartes the scientist should not lead us to downplay the role of Descartes the theistic metaphysician. Descartes’ philosophy, for all its progressive scientific aspects, is located within an overarching epistemic and metaphysical framework that acknowledges our fundamental human dependence. For Descartes, philosophical inquiry could not even begin without an implicit reliance on a stable rational order at the heart of things, and an implicit faith that what comes to us from that source will point us towards the truth.

Keywords:   René Descartes, God, Plato, Augustine, worldview, mathematical physics

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .